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  • Fri, 26 May 2017 07:01:43 +0000

    Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales Movie Review

    It’s time for another movie review presented by our good friends over at FatCats Gilbert on the southwest corner of Greenfield and Baseline! FatCats Gilbert is the best place to see all of the latest box office hits, just like the one I get to talk about today, Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales! To see all showtimes and to purchase tickets, you can click right HERE!

    We have tons of blockbusters coming this summer, and the first fifth installment in a franchise we’re going to have a chance to see belongs to Disney’s beloved pirate franchise. Love them or hate them, it’s hard to deny that these movies have an extremely committed fan-base, and they make loads of money. I love the first one, but I haven’t really loved, or even liked, any of the sequels, so I was hoping that this one could flip the switch. Let’s talk about Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales!

    Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales is directed by Joachim Rønning and Espen Sandberg and stars Johnny Depp, Javier Bardem, Geoffrey Rush, Brenton Thwaites, and Kaya Scodelario. Captain Jack Sparrow and a few brand new allies set sail on the high seas to find the Trident of Poseidon, the only thing that can save him from a ghost he once bested in the Devil’s Traingle.

    At this point in the franchise, it’s tough to expect a movie that brings us back to the original. We’re five movies deep, and we’re obviously in a different place than we were in 2003. I do believe that it’s fair to want certain elements back, and I wanted fun and wonder back. My favorite part about this film is that it gives us that sense of fun and wonder. I was really enjoying the ride, and I was excited for what I was going to see next. It took certain turns and shifts that I waned to see from an unexpected journey. Each sequel so far has severely lacked the sense of enjoyment that the first one provides, and this one brings it back. Next, I loved the visuals in this film. This isn’t a movie where you will walk out of the theater thinking that it was difficult to draw the line between computer generated imagery and reality, but everything that is computer generated perfectly fits the tone of the film as well as the level of mythology it achieves. With this world-build, I bought the CG, and that’s all I needed. I also think that Johnny Depp has a few good scenes in this film. There is one scene in particular in which Jack Sparrow easily beats the main antagonist, and it’s actually one of my favorite Jack Sparrow moments in the entire franchise. Other times it still seems that he’s just another character on Saturday Night Live, but he has a few great moments that bring us back to the original. I did like all of the main characters who were introduced in the film, and this is the first time since watching the original that I’ve actually wanted to dive deeper into the characters.

    Where I think that this movie goes wrong is in the pacing. This movie is about 130 minutes, but it feels much, much longer than that. At certain points I genuinely wondered if it had a path toward the main goal or if it was just meandering until it finally reached a stopping point. It’s disorganized in a way that a few scenes feel unnecessary, and it’s essentially chunked up insanity until we randomly reach a satisfying point in the story. I liked that I never knew what was coming next, but there are plenty of moments that could be removed or that guided the narrative off-track.

    Overall, while I think that this is the best sequel in the franchise, it still doesn’t bring us back to the quality of the original. It’s a heck of a lot of fun. I think it gives us a feeling of wonder and awe in the same way that the first one does by introducing new magic and mythology, but it also has so many unnecessary pieces to the puzzle that I couldn’t quite consider it its own singular unit. There are some great moments from Jack Sparrow, but there are also plenty of moments where Sparrow feels like the character we go back to for the simple sake of familiarity. The filmmakers must have though that this guy has given us laughs and fun before, so why not randomly stick him on-screen to recapture the magic? This movie can be enjoyed, and it has multiple sequences that certainly make it worth checking out, but the pacing and singularity hold it back from even getting close to touching the original. I’m going to give Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales a 6/10.

    Will you be checking this movie out? Comment down in the comment section and let me know! As always, thank you, and keep listening to 88.7 The Pulse!

    The post Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales Movie Review appeared first on 88.7 The Pulse.

  • Fri, 26 May 2017 07:00:59 +0000

    Wakefield Movie Review

    It’s time for another movie review presented by our good friends over at FatCats Gilbert on the southwest corner of Greenfield and Baseline! FatCats Gilbert is the best place to see all of the latest movies in the most comfortable Recline-N-Dine seats! You don’t even have to leave your seat to enjoy delicious pizza, chicken, fries, and more while watching a movie!

    I don’t have much to say in this portion of the review. I didn’t know, well, anything about this movie until a few days ago. All I knew was that it is based on a short story. I love Bryan Cranston and Jennifer Garner. I’m not sure I ever imagined them on-screen in a relationship, but life is full of surprises. Let’s talk about Wakefield!

    Wakefield is directed by Robin Swicord and stars Bryan Cranston and Jennifer Garner. Howard Wakefield, played by Bryan Cranston, has taken it upon himself to move from his house right into his attic to escape his distant marriage. When his family has no idea where he is, he begins to examine his relationship with them as well as how his disappearance affects them. The longer he waits, the more he realizes that things will never be able to go back to the way they were before he left, and he is only delaying an awkward reintroduction with freezing nights and garbage can meals.

    It’s never an unpleasant surprise to see a Bryan Cranston movie in your email inbox when you didn’t even know it was coming. Despite having more diversity in his filmography than one would expect, I think Cranston is relatively consistent in his choices of roles, and I typically like his movies. When I haven’t heard about a film I typically try to hold my expectations in check, but one thing I knew that I could hope for was a great Bryan Cranston performance. Bryan Cranston is really great in this movie, and his performance kept me hooked. This is an odd character study of a man in a marriage that isn’t working its best because he is set in his own ways and doesn’t always take the most ethical approach to certain situations, and Cranston brought out the bits and pieces of oddity and insanity that he needed to to make the film work. I found most of the film fascinating as it peered into the psyche of a man who was so consumed with himself and his beliefs that he made himself disappear so that he could relish in the sadness of his departure. I think it’s an interesting way to look at selfishness as well as the lengths humans may be wiling to go to for reassurance and a reinforced sense of self-importance. I also think that this is a cautionary tale of, again, self-righteousness. The audience looks at this man and sees someone who has ruined his marriage because of his refusal to accept any beliefs or practices that aren’t his own. I also loved the direction of the film. Wakefield seems to be directed and scored as a thriller, but really it’s a character study drama. The director of Wakefield actually wrote it as well, so I’m sure she had ideas of what she would be going for, but it still feels like a fascinating way to tell this story because it is, in a sense, a real thriller. Not many people are going to go up against a serial murderer in their lifetimes, but many people will face marital issues, which can be terrifying in itself. I think the direction and the score perfectly captured that feeling, and I loved the approach.

    I think my main issue with this movie was the characters. We completely understand their motivations, but I never completely felt like the actions of the main character were justified or warranted. In fact, he’s a very difficult-to-like narcissist with lots of overbearing opinions of self-importance. The only reason that this movie exists is to showcase this man and his selfishness, so I never really had anybody to cheer for. It’s not just that he’s relatively unlikable or flat. He’s downright despicable and full of himself. This also makes the story a bit thin. I think that a lot of the story is reduced down to this unjustified character, and it weakens much of the narrative. There is definitely a strong display of monologue writing, but it does end up gelling into the character’s selfishness.

    Overall, Bryan Cranston gives a great performance in this character study that compelled me far more than it should have. Cranston’s performance and the direction are the two reasons this movie actually becomes interesting. I loved that the film was directed and scored like a thriller, but it’s actually a drama. I think that’s one of the main reasons that this movie became as watchable as it was. In some ways, I think that this story that could be considered a drama became a thriller through things that complicate real-world relationships like marital issues, so it worked and fit. My main issue with this movie is that the character is so entertained by his sense of self-importance that I had nobody to cheer for, but the oddity, Cranston’s performance, and the direction all give this movie enough to make it interesting. I’m going to give Wakefield a 6.3/10.

    Will you be checking out Wakefield? Comment down in the comment section and let me know! As always, thank you, and keep listening to 88.7 The Pulse!

    The post Wakefield Movie Review appeared first on 88.7 The Pulse.

  • Fri, 26 May 2017 07:00:26 +0000

    Baywatch Movie Review

    It’s time for another movie review presented by our good friends over at FatCats Gilbert on the southwest corner of Greenfield and Baseline! FatCats Gilbert is the best place to see all of the latest movies at the box office in the comfort of your own recliner!

    Every year I sit down and wonder what will be the comedy of the year. I had to think that Baywatch had a good shot. From the trailers, it appeared to be self-aware take on an older television show with an R-rated twist, which is essentially the 21 Jump Street approach. I love 21 Jump Street, so I couldn’t help but be excited for Baywatch. I never watched the show, but anytime we have a raunchy comedy, I get ready to laugh. I also love Dwayne Johnson, and I’m actually a Zac Efron fan. Maybe he doesn’t hook onto the greatest roles, but he has acting chops. Let’s talk about Baywatch!

    Baywatch is directed by Seth Gordon and stars Dwayne Johnson, Zac Efron, Priyanka Chopra, Alexandra Daddario, Kelly Rohrbach, Ilfenesh Hadera, and Jon Bass. Drugs and dead bodies start to wash up on a bay watched by the finest lifeguards in the world. Being a lifeguard doesn’t just mean that you can move fast in the water. It means that if you blink, you might miss an opportunity to save a life. Nobody knows this better than Mitch Buchanan, played by Johnson, who wants to get to the bottom of this drug and murder case. With his loyal crew and three newcomers, he decides to go beyond his jurisdiction and take down the scum dirtying up his beach.

    I’m not busting barriers open to say that I always want to laugh in comedies. I love to laugh, so I try to be open to jokes and let the comedy and atmosphere suck me in. I thought Baywatch did a decent job of giving me the laughs I wanted. There are some great jokes and gags in this movie that I really believe will go down as some of the best R-rated bits in comedy history. When I say R-rated, I really mean R-rated. Some of these jokes, one in particular, really pushes the envelope, and though it’s not something I’d watch for the graphicness, it still made me laugh to see the characters in the situation. Though I ended up getting laughs out of Baywatch, I think that the best thing about the movie was the cast and the cast chemistry. Dwayne Johnson and Zac Efron have excellent chemistry, and they were both magnetic on-screen. They countered each other so well, but they also showed that they both had their hearts in the same place when push came to shove. Zac Efron proved he has the comedy and the acting chops to hang around with a charisma king like Dwayne Johnson, and Johnson basically makes magical chemistry with anyone he’s put on-screen with. Finally, I have to appreciate the self-awareness this movie presents. It’s not going to be the intelligent, story-driven comedy that is praised for years to come, but it knows that. It knows that it’s a movie you would randomly find on a streaming service and decide to watch with your friends at the beginning of the summer. Most everything that occurs is flat-out ridiculous and dumb, but I didn’t have a problem with unbelievability because it never establishes a realistic world. It establishes a world of ridiculousness, then it stays in that world.

    Though it knows what it is, sometimes it goes to the pieces of the story that I could honestly not have cared less about. For instance, every single time we cut to the villain, Priyanka Chopra, I checked out, and in those scenes we go an extremely long time without a joke. The pacing of the comedy is all over the place. I don’t need to be busting my stomach every other second, but I also don’t want to go into a movie like this where there are ten minute stretches without a laugh. I completely checked out when the tone shifted, and I don’t think it worked at all for the film. This is Baywatch. The story isn’t important. Just give us laughs. Also, I know this isn’t exactly the most valid complaint, but there isn’t much depth to anything in this film. I didn’t care in moments in which I should have cared, and I didn’t care about most of the characters. I might have cared a bit about Dwayne Johnson’s character, but only because he was Dwayne Johsnon. The rest of the characters are either eye candy or crammed down our throats because the writers think that they’re funny. There’s one character in particular who I knew was either going to be absurdly annoying or a comedic standout. Maybe he’s funny in moderation, but when the writers beat us over the head with his awkwardness, it starts to lose the ever so small bit of charm it was presented with at the beginning.

    Overall, Baywatch gave me a lot of things I wanted as well as a lot of things I didn’t want. I wanted laughs. Check. I wanted a charismatic and likable cast. Check. I wanted self-awareness. Check. What I didn’t want was an overemphasis on a flat and overly dark story. It’s not serious in a way that takes away from the self-awareness. It’s serious in a ridiculously unfunny way, and it causes plenty of comedic draughts. Not every line needs to have me rolling in the aisles of the theater, but when I go into an R-rated comedy with ten minute periods without even attempting to get a laugh, there’s a structural problem. There’s also not much to latch onto. Either you’re sold on the comedy or you aren’t. It’s simple as that. Baywatch is a lot of things, and sometimes that’s good, but I wish it would have focused mostly on just being a funny depiction of the cheeseball show it’s based on as compared to interjecting chunks of nothingness. I’m going to give Baywatch a 4.7/10.

    Will you be checking out Baywatch? Comment down in the comment section and let me know! As always, thank you, and keep listening to 88.7 The Pulse!

    The post Baywatch Movie Review appeared first on 88.7 The Pulse.

  • Tue, 23 May 2017 02:04:25 +0000

    Multiple people dead after explosion at Ariana Grande Concert in Manchester

    Our hearts are broken to report that British authorities are reporting that there were fatalities in the area of the arena where Ariana Grande had performed in the United Kingdom on Monday evening (May 22). The explosion happened adjacent to the venue after the concert.

    The Greater Manchester Police Department wrote on Facebook that emergency services were responding to an explosion at the Manchester Arena. Network television is reporting that eyewitnesses told them about a loud explosion near the arena. Grande was scheduled to perform a concert at the arena tonight.

    There are not many details about the incident at this time. However, there are published reports that suggest there are a multiple fatalities.

    Our hearts and prayers are with those affected by this tragedy.

    Photo: NBC

    The post Multiple people dead after explosion at Ariana Grande Concert in Manchester appeared first on 88.7 The Pulse.

  • Mon, 22 May 2017 21:40:53 +0000

    See the complete list of winners from the 2017 Billboard Music Awards

    The 2017 Billboard Music Awards were well underway at the T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas on Sunday evening with Drake being the night’s biggest winner with 13 awards, breaking Adele’s record for the artist with the most in a single year. You can check out the complete list of last night’s winners below.

    Top Artist:
    Adele
    Beyonce
    Justin Bieber
    The Chainsmokers
    Drake — WINNER
    Ariana Grande
    Shawn Mendes
    Rihanna
    Twenty One Pilots
    The Weeknd

    Top New Artist:
    Alessia Cara
    Desiigner
    Lil Uzi Vert
    Lukas Graham
    Zayn — WINNER

    Billboard Chart Achievement Award Presented by Xfinity:
    Luke Bryan
    Nicki Minaj
    The Chainsmokers
    The Weeknd
    Twenty One Pilots — WINNER

    Top Male Artist:
    Justin Bieber
    Drake — WINNER
    Future
    Shawn Mendes
    The Weeknd

    Top Female Artist:
    Adele
    Beyonce — WINNER
    Ariana Grande
    Rihanna
    Sia

    Top Duo/Group:
    The Chainsmokers
    Coldplay
    Florida Georgia Line
    Guns N’ Roses
    Twenty One Pilots — WINNER

    Top Billboard 200 Artist:
    Beyonce
    Drake — WINNER
    Prince
    Twenty One Pilots
    The Weeknd

    Top Hot 100 Artist:
    The Chainsmokers
    Drake — WINNER
    Rihanna
    Twenty One Pilots
    The Weeknd

    Top Song Sales Artist:
    The Chainsmokers
    Drake — WINNER
    Prince
    Justin Timberlake
    Twenty One Pilots

    Top Radio Songs Artist:
    Justin Bieber
    The Chainsmokers
    Drake
    Rihanna
    Twenty One Pilots — WINNER

    Top Streaming Songs Artist:
    The Chainsmokers
    Desiigner
    Drake — WINNER
    Rihanna
    Twenty One Pilots

    Top Social Artist:
    Justin Bieber
    BTS — WINNER
    Selena Gomez
    Ariana Grande
    Shawn Mendes

    Top Touring Artist:
    Justin Bieber
    Beyonce — WINNER
    Coldplay
    Guns N’ Roses
    Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band

    Top R&B Artist:
    Beyonce — WINNER
    Bruno Mars
    Frank Ocean
    Rihanna
    The Weeknd

    Top R&B Tour:
    Beyonce — WINNER
    Lionel Richie
    Rihanna

    Top Rap Artist:
    J. Cole
    Desiigner
    Drake — WINNER
    Future
    Rae Sremmurd

    Top Rap Tour
    Drake — WINNER
    Future
    Kanye West

    Top Country Artist:
    Florida Georgia Line
    Blake Shelton — WINNER
    Keith Urban
    Chris Stapleton
    Jason Aldean

    Top Country Tour:
    Luke Bryan
    Kenny Chesney — WINNER
    Dixie Chicks

    Top Rock Artist:
    Coldplay
    The Lumineers
    Metallica
    Twenty One Pilots — WINNER
    X Ambassadors

    Top Rock Tour:
    Coldplay — WINNER
    Guns N’ Roses
    Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band

    Top Latin Artist:
    J Balvin
    Juan Gabriel — WINNER
    Los Plebes Del Rancho De Ariel Camacho
    Maluma
    Nicky Jam

    Top Dance/Electronic Artist:
    The Chainsmokers — WINNER
    Calvin Harris
    Major Lazer
    DJ Snake
    Lindsey Stirling

    Top Christian Artist:
    Lauren Daigle — WINNER
    Hillsong Worship
    Hillary Scott & the Family
    Skillet
    Chris Tomlin

    Top Gospel Artist:
    Jekalyn Carr
    Kirk Franklin — WINNER
    Travis Greene
    Tamela Mann
    Hezekiah Walker

    Top Billboard 200 Album:
    Beyonce, Lemonade
    Drake, Views — WINNER
    Rihanna, Anti
    Twenty One Pilots, Blurryface
    The Weeknd, Starboy

    Top Soundtrack/Cast Album:
    Hamilton: An American Musical — WINNER
    Moana
    Purple Rain
    Suicide Squad: The Album
    Trolls

    Top R&B Album:
    Beyonce, Lemonade — WINNER
    Bruno Mars, 24K Magic
    Frank Ocean, Blonde
    Rihanna, Anti
    The Weeknd, Starboy

    Top Rap Album:
    J. Cole, 4 Your Eyez Only
    Drake, Views — WINNER
    Kevin Gates, Isla
    DJ Khaled, Major Key
    A Tribe Called Quest, We Got It From Here…Thank You For Your Service

    Top Country Album:
    Jason Aldean, They Don’t Know
    Florida Georgia Line, Dig Your Roots
    Blake Shelton, If I’m Honest
    Chris Stapleton, Traveller — WINNER
    Keith Urban, Ripcord

    Top Rock Album:
    The Lumineers, Cleopatra
    Metallica, Hardwired…To Self Destruct — WINNER
    Radiohead, A Moon Shaped Pool
    Red Hot Chili Peppers, The Getaway
    Twenty One Pilots, Blurryface

    Top Latin Album:
    J Balvin, Energia
    CNCO, Primera Cita
    Juan Gabriel, Los Duo 2 — WINNER
    Juan Gabriel, Vestido De Etiqueta: Por Eduardo Magallanes
    Los Plebes del Rancho de Ariel Camacho, Recuerden Mi Estilo

    Top Dance/Electronic Album:
    The Chainsmokers, Bouquet
    The Chainsmokers, Collage 
    Flume, Skin
    Kygo, Cloud Nine
    Lindsey Stirling, Brave Enough — WINNER

    Top Christian Album:
    Casting Crowns, The Very Next Thing
    Lauren Daigle, How Can It Be — WINNER
    Joey + Rory, Hymns
    Hillary Scott & The Family, Love Remains
    Skillet, Unleashed

    Top Gospel Album:
    Tamela Mann, One Way — WINNER
    Kirk Franklin, Losing My Religion
    Travis Greene, The Hill
    Tasha Cobbs, One Place: Live
    Hezekiah Walker, Better: Azusa – The Next Generation 2

    Top Hot 100 Song:
    The Chainsmokers Featuring Halsey, “Closer” — WINNER
    The Chainsmokers Featuring Daya, “Don’t Let Me Down”
    Drake Featuring WizKid & Kyla, “One Dance”
    Justin Timberlake, “Can’t Stop The Feeling!”
    Twenty One Pilots, “Heathens”

    Top Selling Song:
    The Chainsmokers Featuring Halsey, “Closer”
    The Chainsmokers Featuring Daya, “Don’t Let Me Down”
    Drake Featuring, WizKid & Kyla “One Dance”
    Justin Timberlake, “Can’t Stop The Feeling!” — WINNER
    Twenty One Pilots, “Heathens”

    Top Radio Song:
    The Chainsmokers Featuring Halsey, “Closer”
    The Chainsmokers Featuring Daya, “Don’t Let Me Down”
    Drake Featuring WizKid & Kyla, “One Dance”
    Sia Featuring Sean Paul, “Cheap Thrills”
    Justin Timberlake, “Can’t Stop The Feeling!” — WINNER

    Top Streaming Song (Audio):
    The Chainsmokers Featuring Halsey, “Closer”
    Drake Featuring WizKid & Kyla, “One Dance” — WINNER
    D.R.A.M. Featuring Lil Yachty, “Broccoli”
    Rihanna, “Needed Me”
    The Weeknd Featuring Daft Punk, “Starboy”

    Top Streaming Song (Video):
    The Chainsmokers Featuring Halsey, “Closer”
    Desiigner, “Panda” — WINNER
    Zay Hilfigerr & Zayion McCall, “JuJu On That Beat (TZ Anthem)
    Rae Sremmurd Featuring Gucci Mane, “Black Beatles”
    Twenty One Pilots, “Heathens”

    Top Collaboration:
    The Chainsmokers Featuring Halsey, “Closer” — WINNER
    The Chainsmokers Featuring Daya, “Don’t Let Me Down”
    Drake Featuring WizKid & Kyla, “One Dance”
    Sia Featuring Sean Paul, “Cheap Thrills”
    The Weeknd Featuring Daft Punk, “Starboy”

    Top R&B Song:
    Drake Featuring WizKid & Kyla, “One Dance” — WINNER
    Bruno Mars, “24K Magic”
    Rihanna, “Needed Me”
    Rihanna Featuring Drake, “Work”
    The Weeknd Featuring Daft Punk, “Starboy”

    Top R&B Collaboration:
    Drake Featuring WizKid & Kyla, “One Dance” — WINNER
    PARTYNEXTDOOR Featuring Drake, “Come And See Me”
    Rihanna Featuring Drake, “Work”
    The Weeknd Featuring Daft Punk “I Feel It Coming”
    The Weeknd Featuring Daft Punk, “Starboy”

    Top Rap Song:
    Desiigner, “Panda” — WINNER
    Drake, “Fake Love”
    D.R.A.M. Featuring Lil Yachty, “Broccoli”
    Migos Featuring Lil Uzi Vert, “Bad And Boujee”
    Rae Sremmurd Featuring Gucci Mane, “Black Beatles”

    Top Rap Collaboration:
    D.R.A.M. Featuring Lil Yachty, “Broccoli”
    Zay Hilfigerr & Zayion McCall, “JuJu On That Beat (TZ Anthem)
    Machine Gun Kelly & Camila Cabello, “Bad Things”
    Migos Featuring Lil Uzi Vert, “Bad and Boujee”
    Rae Sremmurd Featuring Gucci Mane, “Black Beatles” — WINNER

    Top Country Song:
    Kenny Chesney Featuring Pink, “Setting The World On Fire”
    Florida Georgia Line, “H.O.L.Y.” — WINNER
    Florida Georgia Line Featuring Tim McGraw, “May We All”
    Little Big Town, “Better Man”
    Keith Urban, “Blue Ain’t Your Color”

    Top Country Collaboration:
    Dierks Bentley Featuring Elle King, “Different For Girls”
    Kenny Chesney Featuring Pink, “Setting The World On Fire” — WINNER
    Eric Church Featuring Rhiannon Giddens, “Kill A Word”
    Florida Georgia Line Featuring Tim McGraw, “May We All”
    Chris Young Featuring Vince Gill, “Sober Saturday Night”

    Top Rock Song:
    Lil Wayne, Wiz Khalifa & Imagine Dragons with Logic & Ty Dolla $ign Featuring X Ambassadors, “Sucker For Pain”
    Twenty One Pilots, “Heathens” — WINNER
    Twenty One Pilots, “Ride”
    Twenty One Pilots, “Stressed Out”
    X Ambassadors, “Unsteady”

    Top Latin Song:
    Daddy Yankee, “Shaky Shaky”
    Enrique Iglesias Featuring Wisin, “Duele El Corazon”
    Nicky Jam, “Hasta El Amanecer” — WINNER
    Shakira Featuring Maluma, “Chantaje”
    Carlos Vives & Shakira, “La Bicicleta”

    Top Dance/Electronic Song:
    The Chainsmokers Featuring Halsey, “Closer” — WINNER
    The Chainsmokers Featuring Daya, “Don’t Let Me Down”
    Calvin Harris Featuring Rihanna, “This Is What You Came For”
    Major Lazer Featuring Justin Bieber & MO, “Cold Water”
    DJ Snake Featuring Justin Bieber, “Let Me Love You”

    Top Christian Song:
    Lauren Daigle, “Trust In You”
    Hillary Scott & The Family, “Thy Will” — WINNER
    Skillet, “Feel Invincible”
    Ryan Stevenson Featuring GabeReal, “Eye Of The Storm”
    Zach Williams, “Chain Breaker”

    Top Gospel Song:
    Jekalyn Carr, “You’re Bigger”
    Tasha Cobbs, Featuring Kierra Sheard “Put A Praise On It”
    Kirk Franklin, “Wanna Be Happy??”
    Travis Greene, “Made A Way” — WINNER
    Hezekiah Walker, “Better”

    Image courtesy of David Becker/Getty Images

    The post See the complete list of winners from the 2017 Billboard Music Awards appeared first on 88.7 The Pulse.

  • Fri, 19 May 2017 20:22:38 +0000

    Alien: Covenant Movie Review

    It’s time for another movie review presented by our good friends over at FatCats Gilbert on the southwest corner of Greenfield and Baseline! FatCats Gilbert is the best place to see all of the latest box office hits such as the one I’m talking about today, Alien: Covenant! To see all showtimes and to purchase tickets, you can click right HERE!

    Of the three reviews I’m going to be able to get out this week, this one is by far the one that I was looking most forward to. I’m a huge fan of the Alien franchise, and I couldn’t wait to see Ridley Scott back behind the camera of an official Alien movie. The first film from 1979 is one of my all-time favorites. It’s probably in my top ten. Ridley Scott is a director I’ve admired since I first started seriously watching movies, and Alien is a huge reason for that. I also love the sequel Aliens, and I actually like a lot about Prometheus. Could Ridley Scott bring this franchise full circle? Let’s find out!

    Alien: Covenant is directed by Ridley Scott and stars Michael Fassbender, Katherine Waterston, Billy Crudup, and Danny McBride. Colonists on the Covenant are on their way to a brand new planet that is said to be inhabitable for humans. When the crew is woken from their cryosleep and hear a transmission from a nearby planet that also seems to be remote, they decide to investigate, but this unexpected gift might be too good to be true.

    Any time you go into a Ridley Scott movie, you have to expect it to look top notch. No matter what you think about his past few films, they all look magnificent. It’s really crazy to think that Ridley Scott is almost 80 years-old, and he’s still making movies like he’s 30. Through his career it’s so nice to see that nothing has clouded his creativity and nothing has stopped him from advancing technologically. Alien: Covenant is no different from his other movies in that it looks phenomenal. I personally think that it’s a step down from Prometheus and The Martian, but it still looks great, and Ridley Scott is one of the best visual storytellers we have today. He is the star and selling point of his films. Much like when you walk into a Tarantino or a Scorsese movie, it doesn’t really matter who is in front of the camera. Scott is the star of his work, and you can tend to expect similar qualities and tendencies from each of his movies that make him such a great filmmaker. Next, some of the performances are very good. Obviously Michael Fassbender is one of the most talented actors working today, but his synthetic being has such a pivotal role in both Prometheus and now Alien: Covenant that he takes center stage and far outshines any of the human characters. In fact, I find him far more emotionally compelling than any of the humans. I love tales of humanity when they’re executed effectively, and the way he goes about synthetically creating a simulation of actual life and life’s decisions is pretty interesting. That was one of my favorite parts about Prometheus, and it comes back to be one of my favorite parts about Alien: Covenant. I won’t get into spoiler territory, but the scenes that ended up stealing the movie, for me, were the scenes where Michael Fassbender essentially carries everything on his shoulders. That’s about all I’m going to say just in case you were trying to avoid any marketing or plot details. I also really liked Danny McBride. I haven’t seen him take on a dramatic role where he has to exhibit a huge range the way he does in Alien: Covenant, and he impressed the heck out of me. Finally, in an Alien movie, you must have the thrills to go with each component that would make a typical film great, and Alien: Covenant provides those thrills. Multiple scenes had me holding myself in my seat, and they felt like classic Alien horror scenes because of Ridley Scott’s direction and the score.

    I have good things to say about this movie, but I’d probably consider it the most disappointing movie I’ve seen this year. First of all, the only two characters I was even moderately invested in were Danny McBride and Michael Fassbender. There is little to no character development in this film. That’s just one aspect that made the original film so special. I didn’t just care about Ripley. I cared about every single member on the Nostromo, so when the kills occurred, I was struck with a bit of grief and understanding that we just lost an important being. The crew of the Nostromo wasn’t just important to each other. They were important to me. I can tell that the crew of the Covenant cares for each other, but I don’t care one single bit about them. At first, I thought it was because there were too many characters, but when I saw a photo of the entire crew towards the end of the film I realized that it was because of terrible character development and how screen time is dispersed. Michael Fassbender, Katherine Waterston, Billy Crudup, and Danny McBride are the only members with sufficient screen time that would allow me to care about them, but the only two who actually have focus on development seem to be Fassbender and McBride. I didn’t care a bit about Waterston’s character, and Crudup’s character made awful decisions as a leader that simply made him an annoyance to the story. Next, there is a very jarring tone shift in this movie. Headed into this film I can see an audience member looking for three things. First, one could just be looking for a good Alien movie. When you don’t account for Prometheus, we haven’t had a good Alien movie since 1986, so hoping to go back to that is an understandable hope. Second, someone buying a ticket to Alien: Covenant could be looking for a sequel to Prometheus. One of the biggest issues fans had with Prometheus was that it didn’t answer all of the questions it proposed. Maybe a sequel could answer those questions with lore that we already know. Third, there’s the audience member who just wants a popcorn flick and doesn’t care about the two other things because they missed the other seven movies. Alien: Covenant tries to please both people who want the first movie as well as the people who want the second movie, but it fails because it’s attempting to make two different movies. The tone and pacing shift from Prometheus to Alien feels so rushed and jarring that the entire narrative feels uneven, and I felt like I saw two wholly different movies. I wanted both a good Alien movie and a sequel to Prometheus, but it didn’t give me either. If I wanted my Alien movie, I didn’t get that until the final thirty minutes, but at the same time it sort of slaps the fans of Prometheus in the face by ignoring and glossing over a lot of mystifying ambiguity that I was hoping to see more of. It opens immense holes in the mythology and seems to forget about its predecessor while demystifying some of the terror of the Xenomorph. Lastly, the ending to Alien: Covenant might be the most predictable ending of the year. There is a moment in the story that instantly gives away the finale. You don’t even need to be thinking. Once you see the film, or if you have seen it, you will or already do know the exact moment I’m talking about. About a minute after that moment I was wondering if the entire theater had the exact same idea that I had given that it didn’t take much brain power to grasp onto. Right as I was thinking about it, my friend who saw the movie with me turned to me and literally told me exactly what I was thinking.

    Overall, I enjoyed Alien: Covenant for what it was. I don’t think it’s necessarily a terrible movie, but it has so much wasted potential. It had a critical job to do by tying Prometheus to the Alien franchise, and in trying to appeal to different parties, it feels extremely uneven and completely fails to appeal to either side. Yes, in case I had to say it, it looks amazing. It’s a Ridley Scott movie, so I wasn’t expecting any less, but I also don’t want to sound spoiled because I will always love to look at movies that are as aesthetically appealing as Alien: Covenant. I can’t understate how great Michael Fassbender is in this film. He has a lot of weight on his shoulders, and to me, what he does and goes through in this film is far more interesting and compelling than anything the Xenomorph or the new Neomorph does. Other than Fassbender, and surprisingly Danny McBride, I felt no emotional weight or compelling reason to be invested in any of these characters. Even the arguable main character of the film, Daniels, played by Katherine Waterston, has no depth. She has one thing, but that’s about it. We never get a feel for her character the way we do about Ellen Ripley. It also doesn’t even try to disguise its ending. It has the most predictable ending of the year, and that took a bit of terror out of the finale. Like I said, I enjoyed it for what it was. It’s an uneven popcorn flick that entertained me, gave me great moments through Michael Fassbender, and had my palms sweating through Ridley Scott’s direction, but on almost all other fronts it’s going to go down as possibly the most disappointing movie of the year. I’m going to give Alien: Covenant a 5.8/10.

    Will you be seeing Alien: Covenant? Comment down in the comment section and let me know! As always, thank you, and keep listening to 88.7 The Pulse!

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  • Fri, 19 May 2017 20:13:59 +0000

    Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul Movie Review

    It’s time for another movie review presented by our good friends over at FatCats Gilbert on the southwest corner of Greenfield and Baseline! FatCats Gilbert is the best place to take the family without stretching the ol’ checkbook. With an arcade, a movie theater, and bowling all under one roof, you won’t have any problems fitting in a fun, air-conditioned, affordable day with the entire family over the summer.

    With the second review this week, let’s talk about another one that I wasn’t very excited for. To be honest, I read most of the books, but that was a long time ago, so I’m pretty sure I’ve grown out of most of the source material as well as the movies. Nevertheless, I wanted to get a review out to hopefully give a little bit of insight as to how both kids and parents will respond to the movie as well as if it’s worth checking out or worth skipping to save your money for Captain Underpants. Let’s talk about Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul!

    Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul is directed by David Bowers and stars Jason Drucker, Alicia Silverstone, Tom Everett Scott, and Charlie Wright. Greg Heffley becomes an Internet sensation for all the wrong reasons. When he learns that his family road-trip is taking him just a short way away from the biggest gaming convention, he decides to take matters into his own hands by recording a video of himself with a well-known online gamer. Things get a bit tougher with his mom outlawing technology on the trip and the family participating in their usual antics.

    If you don’t have anything nice to say, you’re not supposed to say anything at all, right? Instead of the typical positives and negatives, I’ll just tell you how I think that parents and kids will react to this movie and why. For parents, you may get a slight kick out of some of the jokes and bits, but that’s all this movie is. It’s just jokes and bits that never seem to stay on track. Suffice it to say that this movie is structured like diary. It’s day by day. One day might be good, the next day might be bad, and the next day you become the laughing-stock of the Internet. By that third day, you forget everything that happened the first day, and you might be so caught up in the insanity of being an Internet meme that you forget any plans that you made prior to the incident. That’s this movie. It completely forgets about any goals it sets in the beginning in favor of some bits. Parents looking for any type of cohesion or deeper meaning are going to get sloppy slapstick pieces with characters who have little to no redeeming values. On that note, it’s probably not the best thing for kids to see, and possibly want to emulate, characters who are spoiled and entitled and never see repercussions for their actions. If I disobeyed my mom and talked to her the way the kids in this movie do, I probably wouldn’t be able to sit here and write this review. The adults in this movie also make complete fools of themselves. Imagine if a fully grown man ran around in real life exacting petty and violent revenge on a twelve year-old. Society would be an absolute mess. I’m also somewhat confident that I could have written this screenplay when I was in third grade. There are no underlying messages or lessons to be learned. It’s full of elementary school gags that have no sense of direction. Finally, if you go into this movie as a fan of the books, you’re probably going to be disappointed by the way it uses its source material for about three minutes at the beginning and one minute in the end. Other than those four minutes, the classic illustration of the books is never used to tell the story, so there’s really no point of utilizing it at all. If I had to find some redeeming qualities, the camerawork isn’t completely incompetent. In fact, it’s really not bad at all. Maybe if this director was given something other than choppy bits of story he could actually make a decent film.

    Overall, to sum things up very quickly, Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul has a terrible screenplay, entitled and selfish characters, and no sense of cohesion. Adults will see that even after digging twenty layers below the surface, there is still no substance or education to be found. Kids might be entertained by some of the slapstick bits, but they’re still being shown characters who should never be mimicked or followed. There’s a cute pig in the movie, the camerawork is decent, and the new Rodrick wears a t-shirt that I actually own myself, but other than those three things, I have nothing good to say about this movie, and I have a hard time suggesting that anyone see it. I’m going to give Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul a 1/10.

    Will you be checking out Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul? Comment down in the comment section and let me know! As always, thank you, and keep listening to 88.7 The Pulse!

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  • Fri, 19 May 2017 20:07:18 +0000

    Everything, Everything Movie Review

    It’s time for another movie review presented by our good friends over at FatCats Gilbert on the southwest corner of Greenfield and Baseline! FatCats Gilbert is the best place to see the biggest box office releases in the comfort of your own recliner! To see showtimes and to purchase tickets, you can click right HERE!

    There are three reviews coming this week, and the first one we’re going to talk about is one that I wasn’t too seriously excited to see. I guess I’m just getting sick of the YA book-to-film adaptations. They’re all far too predictable because they’re all the same, yet somehow they make boat loads of money, so we’re probably going to see one after another land in theaters no matter how many bad ones we get. If you’re excited to see this movie or you loved the book, more power to you, but the minute I heard this premise I could draw a few conclusions as to how I assumed that the story would end. Anyways, let’s talk about Everything, Everything!

    Everything, Everything is directed by Stella Meghie and stars Amandla Stenberg and Nick Robinson. Maddy, played by Stenberg, has lived her entire life inside the confines of a technologically advanced and sterile house after finding out that she has a rare disease that causes her cells to be unable to fight bacteria and allergens. Only three people in the entire world know that she exists, but that changes when a brand new boy named Olly, played by Robinson, moves in next door. They fall for each other, but given Maddy’s disease it’s difficult for them to be together. They both must risk everything if they want to see their love through.

    First of all, as I hope to with all romantic movies, I was at least slightly involved in the relationship between the two characters. I found some good character development in the pair, and I saw what drew them to each other. For Maddy, I can only imagine what it must be like to have to sit inside for your entire life and never be able to interact face-to-face with someone who has something in common with you. After 18 years of the same thing every day, I understand why she was fed up with her loneliness, and she felt the need to explore the world through the first boy who had ever made her feel like she mattered to the outside world. For Olly, he’s not exactly the most popular guy in school, mostly because he can’t stay at a single school for very long due to issues in his family. He finally has this person who cares deeply about him, and the thought that he couldn’t have her just because life has put immovable obstacles in their way gave his side of the relationship depth. I also think that both leads gave pretty good performances. Nick Robinson proved that he has some charisma, and I found his character likable. He’s a little bit too smooth sometimes, but if you put yourself in the right mindset to watch this movie then it’s forgivable. Finally, this is a good-looking movie. As you can probably imagine, a good chunk of the film takes place inside, but I thought that they did a good job of lighting shots and making Maddy’s house look livable. If I’m going to live in a house for 18 years without leaving, I’d want it to be a paradise, and this house gives Maddy bright light filled with bright blues and yellows that give us a happy and hopeful feel. Even most shots that could very easily have been stock footage appear to have been shot with the same care that the critical points of the story were shot with. There are many key moments where communication takes place in settings that Maddy has created, and I think that was a clever way to put us, the audience, in her world through production design and direction.

    For me, the negatives far outweigh the positives of the movie. I mentioned that pieces of this puzzle take the right mindset. If you have zero intentions of analyzing choices in this film, I implore you to walk in with an empty mind ready to accept everything that happens as sweet and good intentioned. If you don’t, you’ll probably find the main source of the negatives in the logistics of the storytelling. If you tend to walk out of movies wondering how 18-year-old girls with zero income or credit history get credit cards without anybody knowing or having any intentions of paying the money back, Everything, Everything may not be for you. Each plot point is very convenient, and the movie asks you to suspend a lot of your reservations for how the financial and technological world works. It also suffers from a lot of choppy and jarring editing. It will take you from setting to setting or scene to scene without any rhyme or reason, and often times I found myself wondering how and when we arrived at our current destination. Again, it asks you to roll with the punches just because the story is sweet. Finally, I have a few story problems that don’t have to do with the obvious logistical holes. It’s very exposition-heavy, and none of the reveals worked for me. There may be an ever-so-minor spoiler in this next sentence, but if you didn’t expect this to happen from the premise then you must have expected a complete snoozefest. When Maddy finally goes outside, I never felt that sense of wonder or exploration that she should have when exploring a new place. She never experiences that blissful moment when you step outside and get natural light and air. She walks outside and is automatically okay with her surroundings and state. There is also a big story reveal that just didn’t work for me from a dramatic standpoint and a conflict standpoint. I appreciated a certain control of conflict the story demonstrated until this reveal, but it all went out the window.

    Overall, Everything, Everything hit me with a few unexpected notes from a storytelling standpoint, but I actually didn’t like the unexpected direction it went. Yes, I cared slightly about the relationship, but it’s not a “Noah and Allie” level of caring, which, to me, is the ultimate level of caring about a romantic relationship in a film. I think that this movie could be a decent Netflix watch that you could put on late at night if you’re looking for a romantic movie. You can flick your brain off and give it a shot because it’s sweet and has good intentions. The problem is that sweetness and good intentions don’t make a story that’s able to throw logistics out the window. Use your heart and you might enjoy Everything, Everything. Use your brain and you’ll find gaping holes. I’m going to give Everything, Everything a 4/10.

    Will you be seeing Everything, Everything? Comment down in the comment section and let me know! As always, thank you and keep listening to 88.7 The Pulse!

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  • Fri, 12 May 2017 07:00:21 +0000

    The Wall Movie Review

    It’s time for another movie review presented by our good friends over at FatCats Gilbert on the southwest corner of Greenfield and Baseline! FatCats Gilbert is the best place to see all of the latest releases in comfortable recliners while delicious pizza is brought right to your seat! To see showtimes and to purchase tickets, you can click right HERE!

    I’m so excited to be able to talk about The Wall today! I’m a big fan of war movies, so I always look forward to the one or two we get per year. Even more exciting was that Doug Liman was behind the camera on The Wall. Doug Liman might be known for his action chops, but he also directed Swingers, so he can handle different genres, even if multiple genres come together in the same film, and that’s exactly what he was out to do with The Wall. I was hooked from the minute this movie was announced and I saw the trailer. I thought John Cena killed it in Trainwrecked, and he and Dwayne Johnson are leading the charge of charismatic WWE transfers who I can’t wait to see in movies. I’ve also been a huge Aaron Taylor-Johnson fan since I saw first saw Kick-Ass, which ended up being one of my favorite films. Let’s talk about The Wall!

    The Wall is directed by Doug Liman and stars John Cena and Aaron Taylor-Johnson as two American soldiers, a sniper and a spotter, who are on a mission to inspect a hot area for any life. After waiting for almost an entire day, they decide that it’s safe to converge on the spot, but they suddenly realize that they were outlasted by another sniper who shoots both of them. Without help on the way, the only place to take cover is behind a wall on its last leg.

    Like I mentioned earlier, I’m a huge fan of war movies. Though they can be controversial, I like to look at them as character pieces, and I think that they can pull out the most fearless and daring stories through brave characters, excellent drama, and visceral action sequences. I think that The Wall is a very effective war film on most aspects of your typical war flick, but let’s start with the performances. I actually think that this is the most suitable role for John Cena to be introduced to a purely dramatic part. Though there are really only two actors physically making an on-screen appearance, Cena doesn’t get a ton of screen time. It’s not that I don’t want to see Cena suck up screen time, because I do, but it’s always going to be hard to see a character instead of John Cena because he’s such a presence both in his body and in his personality. He doesn’t have enough screen time in this film to be an infectious and likable guy, so he was really able to peel back the layers of the soldier and become what he needed to become. I thought he gave an amazing performance that will probably open more dramatic roles for him. I wish we were here to talk about how much fun we had in a John Cena movie, but Aaron Taylor-Johnson stole this film. He didn’t have any choice but to steal it. This is his Cast Away. 70 of the 80 minutes of this film’s runtime are focused on Aaron Taylor-Johnson, and it takes something special to be able to carry a story all by yourself for that long, and Taylor-Johnson kept me locked in. Another thing that I loved about this movie was that it’s a turtle-paced, high-intensity drama. Most of the time when you go into a war movie you can expect an all-out action scene. I’m never against those scenes, but this movie stayed so small and contained, and it felt like a real military mission. War isn’t a constant battle. There’s a lot of waiting around and patience involved. This movie mirrors that aspect of war so well, and it takes a strategical approach to the genre as compared to the typical stance that looks like an action blood bath. War is a psychological battle as well, which can be even more terrifying, and The Wall tackles that.

    As much as I love the slow burn, I do think that the pacing is where this movie falls short. There are times where I fell out of the movie, and most of the reason is because I feel like the characters could have been expanded upon a bit more. The only reason that this movie is watchable is because of Aaron Taylor-Johnson’s screen presence. We meet this character right off the bat, and from there we don’t learn a ton about him other than a few conclusions and theories I drew by myself that I won’t discuss here so that I don’t spoil anything. We learn why he’s a spotter, but that’s about it. From there, the psychological battle is the reason that this movie works. I do think it’s possible that this was a concept that wasn’t fully developed. The runtime helped tremendously because if it was longer than 80 minutes, it would have been a paper-thin snooze fest. I think that this story could have worked for a single act of a film better than as a feature-length film all by itself.

    Overall, The Wall gave me goosebumps in certain moments. It has sequences that were able to lock me in and keep me hooked due to the fact that it took a completely different approach than most war films. So many war movies present an all out battle, but war does have a lot of psychological components and moral contests to it. I have to appreciate war movies like The Wall because they’re uncommon and put known stories in different perspectives giving them a whole new edge. Though I don’t like it as much, The Wall could be 2017’s Eye in the Sky. Aaron Taylor-Johnson pulled a Cast Away in this movie, and he carried it to the finish line. He was the only one on-screen for most of the film, and his screen presence is what brings this movie to life. Doug Liman also directed this movie as well as he possibly could have, and his long takes allowed Taylor-Johnson to become the character and really act as compared to cutting around difficulty. I do think that the story feels stretched, almost as though it should have been a single act of a film as compared to a film in itself, and I wish we would have learned more about Taylor-Johnson’s character as compared to only being able to draw conclusions based on the facts we gathered throughout the story. The Wall might be slow, but it brings something fresh to the table. I’m going to give The Wall a 7/10.

    Will you be checking out The Wall? Comment down in the comment section and let me know! As always, thank you, and keep listening to 88.7 The Pulse!

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  • Wed, 10 May 2017 21:00:15 +0000

    King Arthur: Legend of the Sword Movie Review

    It’s time for another movie review presented by our good friends over at FatCats Gilbert on the southwest corner of Greenfield and Baseline! FatCats Gilbert is the best place to see all of the latest movies! I didn’t know what I was missing before my first trip to FatCats Gilbert. Now when I watch movies in anything other than a recliner, I don’t feel like I’m doing it right.

    This is probably the biggest movie of the summer! This movie is supposed to be the one to break all of the box office records! Well, to be honest, I’m not really sure who was asking for a King Arthur summer blockbuster. If you were one of those people who couldn’t wait for this, I couldn’t be happier for you, but I don’t think there were many out there. Guy Ritchie’s name was also attached to this which also wasn’t something that pumped me up. He’s coming off The Man from U.N.C.L.E., which I actually liked, but I feel like that’s where Guy Ritchie is at home as compared to with a King Arthur movie or with a live action Aladdin movie. Let’s talk about King Arthur: Legend of the Sword!

    King Arthur: Legend of the Sword is directed by Guy Ritchie and stars Charlie Hunnam, Jude Law, and Eric Bana. Arthur, played by Hunnam, has not inherited the throne the way he was supposed to, and he has found life in the poorer parts of Londinium. He finally pulls Excalibur from the stone, revealing that he is meant to be royalty. He leads a charge against the brutal leader Vortigern, played by Law, to take his rightful place as King.

    I thought that this movie was going to be awful without a doubt. I absolutely love the Disney classic The Sword and the Stone, but it’s not like I was dying to dive deeper into this mythology in a live action summer blockbuster. I’m happy to say that I liked it more than I thought I would. It’s far from perfect, or even great, but I enjoyed certain aspects of it. First of all, Charlie Hunnam has actually blown me away in 2017. First we had The Lost City of Z, which I really liked, and I thought he was excellent in that movie. Now instead of a smaller, more intimate character piece we are getting him in an action-fantasy blockbuster character piece, and I thought he killed it again. His delivery actually works well with Guy Ritchie’s style, and he’s charismatic enough for us to get behind him as a character and be invested in his story. I also thought that Jude Law and Eric Bana were very good, and their performances matched the dramatics of the mythology and the story. That brings us to the next thing that I found enjoyable, and that was the magic and mythos. I didn’t expect quite as much magic in this film as I ended up seeing, but I think it worked for the story and for the characters. I also think there are some great action sequences that are entertaining enough to have some fun with this. There are certain aspects of a King Arthur movie that you can, and frankly should, expect to be awesome. I wanted to see great mythology that was at least somewhat true to what I knew, I wanted great fight scenes, and I wanted chills when Arthur ripped Excalibur from the stone. I think that Ritchie handles the mythology well at certain points. Some of the action scenes are fun when the magic is interjected, and the scene where Arthur pulls Excalibur from the stone is pretty exciting because you actually get to see all of the magic and history rush into Arthur’s body as he decides both if he wants to and if he’s ready to take on Vortigern.

    Funny enough, I think that Guy Ritchie is one of the main reasons that this movie didn’t completely work for me. If you’ve seen Ritchie’s other films, you’ll be able to pick up on his style right away. It’s a very dialogue heavy, edit-heavy, fast-paced style, and it doesn’t quite fit this classic tale. When I picture a fantasy setting, I imagine it taking place thousands of years ago, so Ritchie’s modern style is very jarring and makes the film feel very uneven. I can see a lot of people walking out feeling like some of what they saw was visually appealing, but they might be wondering what they saw. The quick-cutting style of Ritchie’s films also messes with some of the character development. I didn’t quite care about a few of the side characters because there’s a relentless pattern of cutting to the character, the character makes a joke, cut to a different character. I laughed here and there, but when all I get from a character is a joke, then we cut away from the character, I lose sight of what makes them valuable to the story. I think there are too many times where the film goes heavy on the jokes as compared to focusing on being a singular narrative.

    Overall, I didn’t think that King Arthur: Legend of the Sword was a terrible movie, but it’s also not that great. It split me right down the middle. I think that Charlie Hunnam is great in the lead role, and I loved him as Arthur. I’m not looking forward to sequels, but if we get them then I’m glad Charlie Hunnam is front and center. I had some fun with this movie, and a lot of it was due to the mythology itself. I think introducing as much magic as was introduced worked well for the story, and gave Arthur depth. It also made the fight scenes much more visceral and put more on the line for characters involved in fights. I do think that the film is very uneven due to the way the mythology is presented. Guy Ritchie has a very modern take on this story, but it belongs in a medieval time period. When characters, setting, production design, mythology, and world build are all suited for medieval times, it feels really jarring to bring a modern, quick-cutting visual style to this world. I’m going to give King Arthur: Legend of the Sword a 5/10.

    Will you be checking out King Arthur: Legend of the Sword? Comment down in the comment section and let me know! As always, thank you, and keep listening to 88.7 The Pulse!

    The post King Arthur: Legend of the Sword Movie Review appeared first on 88.7 The Pulse.

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